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St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Parish

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Previous Live-Stream Recordings

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Msgr. Norb Ernst Pastor
Email Msgr. Norb

June

I wanted to include in our bulletin the announcement from the Archbishop regarding the lifting of the dispensation, as the last phrase is very important:

“Archbishop Mitchell Rozanski is lifting the dispensation of the faithful to attend Mass on Sundays and Holy Days of Obligation as of July 1, 2021. We understand that these continue to be uncertain times for everyone, and we want all to feel safe returning to Mass. Please note that parishioners who are sick, homebound, immunocompromised and gravely concerned for their health retain the dispensation from the obligation to attend Mass, WHICH HAS ALWAYS BEEN THE CASE IN NORMAL TIMES.”

So, that’s the ancient Catholic tradition, anyone with a serious health issue is not obligated to attend Mass.

We recently mailed out the ACA cards to those who had not as yet responded to the appeal. There is always a short time-lag in the records we receive from the ACA Office, so if you did already contribute but received your card in the mail, MY APOLOGIES!

Remember, even a small donation, when joined with all your fellow Catholics throughout the Archdiocese, can do a lot of good for a lot of people in need, especially this year. My personal thanks to all who have participated in this year’s Annual Catholic Appeal.

Attention parents of grade school children and high school youth. Encourage your young ones to join us for Totus Tuus (Latin for Totally Yours) a summer catechetical camp here at our parish campus sponsored by our Youth Ministry for the week of June 21 – 25. Further information is in this bulletin.

Legacy. It’s an important word. I hear it most often during the eulogy at a Funeral Mass. How do we want to be remembered? What kind of impact will we leave behind? Regardless of your age or economic status, I encourage you to begin thinking about the legacy you wish to leave behind and consider remembering your parish in your estate planning. Naturally, most people first consider their families, but I gently remind you to also think about your parish or your parish Catholic school. When doing your estate planning, I encourage you to remember your parish that serves you today and to secure the future of our parish and our school. What will your Catholic legacy be?

Many have asked about the summer musical presented by The Fr. Scheid Players. Our Director has decided, for the sake of everyone’s safety, to cancel this summer’s production. We love our audience! Hope to see you next year!

God bless you!

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 Preschool and Kindergarten
Registration is now open.

Registration Information

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NEW SYSTEM FOR SAFE ENVIRONMENT COMPLIANCE

The Archdiocese of St. Louis has developed a new system for safe environment compliance called Prevent and Protect STL. Everyone (clergy, employees, and volunteers) ministering to minors and vulnerable adults in the Archdiocese is required and asked to register in the new system. Click here for more information.

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Stay Informed
Current Bulletin

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Happenings

  • Totus Tuus
    June 21 – 25 M – F, 9 am – 3 pm for children entering Grades 1-6 S – Th, 7 – 9 …
  • Knights of Columbus Golf Tournament
    KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS GOLF TOURNAMENT Saturday, July 17, 2021 Oak Valley Golf Course & Resort 1230 Abbey Lane Pevely, MO 63070 oakvalleygolfcourse.com …


More Happenings…

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Current Religious Schedules

Monday – Friday, 6:30 & 8:00 am Saturday – 8:00 am
Parish Live-Stream Page
Previous Live-Stream Recordings

Saturday Vigil 4:30 pm
Sunday 7, 8:30, 10:00 & 11:30 am.
Parish Live-Stream Page
Previous Live-Stream Recordings

Saturdays, after 8:00 am Live Stream Mass approximately 8:40 am
Saturdays 3:30 to 4:15 pm Also, the First Tuesday of
the month at 8:30 am or by Appointment

Each Sunday from 6 to 7 pm, Fr. Samuel will offer a
Virtual Holy Hour Live Stream including Adoration and Benediction
of the Blessed Sacrament. Everyone is welcome to
join us through the same link that is used for daily Mass.
Holy Hour is live-streamed.
Parish Live-Stream Page
Previous Live-Stream Recordings

Praised be Jesus Christ, now and forever!

God’s blessings to our faithful adorers. We were given permission to reopen Eucharistic Adoration beginning Monday, June 15, 2020. The exposition will begin at 6:00 am, ending at 7:00 pm, Monday – Friday. The church will remain open for the whole parish for quiet prayer Monday – Friday from 6:15 am – 7:00 pm.

Adoration will continue to be 1-hour time slots. Adorers will have the opportunity to sign up for the hour they had prior to the pandemic. You are welcome to return to adoration whenever you feel safe and comfortable, whether that be next week, month or year.

Guidelines for returning to adoration are as follows: 1. Adoration will be in the chapel and there will be designated chairs where you can sit. 2. A mask must be worn. 3. Be conscientious about maintaining social distance if you are there with another adorer. 4. Cleaning products will be provided and you will be required to clean the area in which you were sitting and/or kneeling. 5. The schedule will be hung in the same location outside of the chapel as it was in the past. 6. Please remain with our Lord until the next adorer arrives. There will not be any sign-in sheet at this time. 7. Prayerfully consider taking your adoration time. If you choose not to return at this time, we will find an adorer to fill in for you. We would appreciate your help by letting us know whether or not you would like to resume your hour. 8. Refrain from utilizing the reading material that is located in the chapel. 9. As always, please feel free to contact us with any questions or concerns.

For more information … Email:smmaadorationchapel@gmail.com.
Website: smmaadorationchapel.com

Adoration Chairpersons: Kathy and Rich Sartori.  Kathy can be reached at 314-422-7670. Rich can be reached at 314-422-4069.

Parish Live-Stream Page

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Supporting Our Parish

This may be a good time to
sign up for online giving.
Here you can make a one-time donation if you do not want
to sign up at this time.

As always thanks for supporting our Parish!

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"Each of you knows that the foundation of our faith is charity. Without it, our religion would crumble. We will never be truly Catholic unless we conform our entire lives to the two commandments that are the essence of the Catholic faith: to love the Lord, our God, with all our strength, and to love our neighbor as ourselves."— Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati See MoreSee Less
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St. John Francis Regis (1597–1640) was born to a wealthy French merchant and his noble wife. After being educated by the Jesuits, he joined their order at the age of 18 and was later ordained a priest. He grew into a skilled preacher and catechist, and received an assignment to evangelize the French provinces that had fallen to the Protestants – the Huguenots – as well as lapsed Catholics. He devoted his life to this mission and was very successful, winning countless souls to Christ. He preached the Gospel to men, women, and children in all walks and stations of life, even traveling on foot to wild mountain parishes as a missionary priest. He would live on meager meals while spending his days in prayer, preaching, hearing confessions, and visiting prisons and hospitals. He raised controversy when he established hostels for converted prostitutes to remain chaste and work for their sustenance in the lace-making and embroidery trades. He is also remembered for stationing a granary to feed the poor, which at times was miraculously replenished. St. Regis is the patron of embroiderers, social workers, and lace makers. His feast day is June 16th. See MoreSee Less
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"It is suffering, more than anything else, which clears the way for the grace which transforms human souls. Suffering, more than anything else makes present in the history of humanity the powers of the Redemption."— Pope St. John Paul II See MoreSee Less
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St. Germaine Cousin (1579–1601) was born in a remote French village to a peasant farmer. She was born with a deformed right arm and a disease that causes abscesses in her neck. Her mother died when she was an infant, and her father remarried. Due to Germaine’s deformities, her stepmother was thoroughly disgusted with her. She severely neglected and physically abused the child, and taught others to do the same. Starving, sick, and dressed in rags with no shoes, Germaine was forced to sleep in the barn. Her stepmother once attempted to kill her off by sending her to tend sheep near a wolf-infested forest. St. Germaine was a simple and pious child, and through her extreme hardships she developed a deep interior life. She prayed the rosary and went to Mass daily, leaving her sheep to the care of her guardian angel. Even though she was emaciated, she shared the little food she had with beggars. Her piety was admired by the village children, and adults gradually became aware of her holiness, especially when news of her miracles began to circulate. St. Germaine died at the age of twenty-two, succumbing to her poor living conditions. Many years later her body was found incorrupt. Villagers began praying for her intercession and receiving miraculous cures, resulting in her canonization in 1867. St. Germaine is the patron saint of unattractive people, peasant girls, abuse victims, handicapped people, and abandoned people. Her feast day is June 15th. See MoreSee Less
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"Cast yourself into the arms of God and be very sure that if He wants anything of you, He will fit you for the work and give you strength."— St. Philip Neri See MoreSee Less
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"After this I had a vision of a great multitude, which no one could count, from every nation, race, people, and tongue. They stood before the throne and before the Lamb, wearing white robes and holding palm branches in their hands. They cried out in a loud voice: "Salvation comes from our God, who is seated on the throne, and from the Lamb.""Revelation 7:9-10 See MoreSee Less
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St. Joseph the Hymnographer (816-883 A.D.) was born in Sicily to a pious Christian family. When Muslims invaded the island, his family moved to Greece to escape persecution. At the age of fifteen he entered a monastery and grew in holiness and virtue. St. Gregory the Dekapolite took Joseph with him to Constantinople to defend the traditional reverence of icons in opposition to the iconoclast heresy. Joseph was then chosen by the local clergy to be a messenger to Pope Leo III to obtain the Holy Father’s assistance in battling the iconoclast heretics, who were gaining power and influence. On his way to Rome, Joseph was captured by Muslims who delivered him into the hands of the iconoclast heretics. While held a prisoner, St. Nicholas appeared to Joseph and asked him to sing in the name of God. After six years Joseph was freed from prison and returned to Constantinople, where he founded a monastery dedicated to his friend St. Gregory. He also dedicated a church in the name of St. Bartholomew, to whom he had a devotion. St. Bartholomew then appeared to Joseph in a dream and encouraged him to write hymns for the Church. After writing his first hymn in honor of St. Bartholomew, Joseph dedicated other hymns to St. Nicholas, the Blessed Virgin Mary, and other saints. During his life he composed nearly 1,000 hymns. When another wave of iconoclasm arose, he again stood steadfast against it and was exiled for eleven years as a result; he was later exiled a second time for defending orthodox Christian doctrine. He finally died full of years in Constantinople. His feast day is June 14. See MoreSee Less
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